Month: May 2017

Chiswick – Hogarth 2

Hogarth House in Chiswick is a little hard to find, but is well worth the visit. Hogarth bought the house as a summer retreat and even though it is now a museum it still has the feeling of being lived in. Many of Hogarth’s prints are on display.
Nearby is neo-Palladian Chiswick House and its impressive garden which you can also visit.

Hogarth House Chiswick

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London – Bloomsbury 13

The artist, William Hogarth, was another important benefactor of the Foundling Hospital (see previous post). He donated many paintings and prints and encouraged other artists to do the same, forming what became England’s first public art gallery. This print, “Gin Lane”, is one of many works by Hogarth that you can see at the Foundling Hospital Museum in Brunswick Square in Bloomsbury.

Hogarth Etching Gin Lane

London – Bloomsbury 12

In the opposite corner of Brunswick Square to the Barrie house is the Foundling Hospital Museum. Founded in the late 18th century to care for destitute children, the museum now has interesting exhibitions about its history, and rooms that honour two important benefactors, Handel and Hogarth.
The great German/English composer, George Frideric Handel, organised an annual benefit concert and left the manuscript of his masterpiece, “the Messiah” to the hospital.
Handel’s music is celebrated on the top floor of the museum, where there is this interesting timeline wheel which connects Handel’s life with other historic events of the period.

Handel Timeline Table

London – Bloomsbury 11

Jerome K Jerome is another late 19th century/early 20th century writer who is remembered with a plaque in Bloomsbury. Jerome, the author of “Three Men in a Boat”, lived briefly at 32 Tavistock Place.
Jerome was a friend of J.M. Barrie (see previous post) and a member of Barrie’s amateur cricket team along with other writers such as Rudyard Kipling and H. G. Wells.

Jerome K Jerome Plaque

London – Bloomsbury 10

Today is the birthday of J.M. Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan. While in London, we passed by one of the first places where he lived when he came from Scotland in 1885. A blue plaque marks the spot where Barrie lived in lodgings, on the corner of Grenville and Bernard streets, in a building which no longer exists. In Peter Pan, this house became the Darlings home where Peter flew in to meet Wendy.

JM Barrie House Site

Subiaco – Mueller Park

As one of Perth’s oldest suburbs, Subiaco has lots of historical connections, including a park named after an eminent 19th century botanist. Ferdinand von Mueller came to Australia from Germany in 1847. He held the position of government botanist in the state of Victoria and travelled widely collecting botanical specimens.
He was a prolific writer, publishing many scientific papers and important books such as “Eucalyptographia: A Descriptive Atlas of the Eucalypts of Australia and the Adjoining Islands”.
Mueller Park has some large gum trees (eucalypts) and also avenues of Norfolk Island pines and very old Peppermint trees.

Mueller Park Subiaco

Victoria Park – Hayley Welsh

We visited the exhibition “Torn” by Hayley Welsh a few weeks ago and mentioned it here. This week, Hayley went back to her street art roots and painted some of her imaginary animals at various locations along a stretch of Albany Highway in Victoria Park. This outdoor exhibition, titled “The Things We Can Find” did not have a book reading animal but there was one with what looks like a rolled up newspaper.

Hayley Welsh Victoria Park